Consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems

Deontological ethics there are two major ethics theories that attempt to specify and justify moral rules and principles: utilitarianism and deontological ethics utilitarianism (also called consequentialism) is a moral theory developed and refined in the modern world in the writings of jeremy bentham (1748-1832) and john stuart mill (1806-1873. Ethical systems can generally be broken down into three categories: deontological, teleological and virtue-based ethics the first two are considered deontic or action-based theories of morality because they focus entirely on the actions which a person performs. Deontological ethical system believes that the morality of an act is based in the act itself whereas teleological ethical system believes that the morality of an act is based on the outcome or consequences of the act. 02/18/2015 brandon christensen liberty, philosophy aggression, consequentialism, consequentialist, deontological ethics, deontology, non-aggression principle, property rights i am not a philosopher.

22 utilitarian ethics utilitarian ethics is a normative ethical system that is primarily concerned with the consequences of ethical decisions therefore it can be described as a teleological theory or consequentialist theory, which are essentially the same thing, both having a notion that the consequence of the act is the most important determinant of the act being moral or not. Deontology vs consequentialism vs virtue ethics deontology is usually contrasted with consequentialism and virtue ethics , the other two main branches of western moral philosophy these branches do not exactly compete think of them more as different lenses focusing on different aspects of morality. Consequentialism vs deontology consequentialism and deontology are clashing moral philosophies in the field of ethics they clash because each offers a different approach to determining right from wrong.

Deontological ethical systems maintain that an action can be morally right (a duty or an obligation) even if an alternative action in a given situation would have better overall consequences theories of this type thus deny what consequentialist ethical systems affirm, namely, that morally right actions are all and only those that have optimal. This is due to the fact that this is a duty based ethical decision-making approach, which basically defines a decision that is made based upon an individual's duty-based moral obligation to adhere to recognize societal standards, as being ethical or deontological. I am not arguing that deontological ethics is the best system of ethics deontology and teleology, in terms of ethics, are two moral extremes my only goal was to show that the extreme of deontology is superior to that of teleology.

Ethical formalism is a deontological ethical system and utilitarianism is a teleological ethical system there are five other major ethical systems besides teleological and deontological those other five major ethical systems are religion, natural law, the ethics of virtue, the ethics of care and egoism. Teleological ethics are also often referred to as consequentialism teleology extends beyond just ethics, and refers to any aspect of existence with a definite end, whether in human behavior or in nature. Among the teleological ethical systems are utilitarianism, ethics of virtue, and ethics of care utilitarianism is the view that what is good is determined by the consequences of the action we will write a custom essay sample on deontological vs teleological ethical systems specifically for you. A common refrain one hears from american libertarians is that liberal ethics is consequentialist this is a very old trope, dating all the way back to the utilitarianism vs natural rights debates of 18th century britain. According to the definition of deontology in ethics, it focuses more on obligation, duty, or ideal expectations like its previously-mentioned counterpart, it focuses on conduct, but there is a minor difference between deontology and consequentialism in this case.

Consequentialism is usually contrasted with deontological ethics (or deontology), in that deontology, in which rules and moral duty are central, derives the rightness or wrongness of one's conduct from the character of the behaviour itself rather than the outcomes of the conduct. Deontological approaches to decision making look at the action and decide whether it is right or wrong teleological approaches, however, look at the consequences of an action to see if it is at least as good as any available alternative. Under the general heading of normative, two of the most important schools of ethical thought are the consequentialist and the deontological schools of ethical thought we will write a custom essay sample on consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems specifically for you. Hen examining various normative theories, a distinction is often made between deontological and teleological perspectives deontology (from the greek deon, meaning duty) refers to an ethical theory or perspective based on duty or obligation.

Consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems

consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems Deontology (or deontological ethics) is the branch of ethics in which people define what is morally right or wrong by the actions themselves, rather than referring to the consequences of those actions, or the character of the person who performs them.

Ethics of virtue is the next major ethical system virtue ethics is currently one of three major approaches in normative ethics it may, initially, be identified as the one that emphasizes the virtues, or moral character, in contrast to the approach which emphasizes duties or rules (deontology) or that which emphasizes the consequences of. Teleological ethics, (teleological from greek telos, end logos, science), theory of morality that derives duty or moral obligation from what is good or desirable as an end to be achieved also known as consequentialist ethics, it is opposed to deontological ethics (from the greek deon. The difference between teleological and deontological ethical systems, are teleological ethical system is based on the outcome of an act if you do something that is bad as long as the outcome of that act is good then it is considered to be a good act. Consequentialism ftw deontology is a very inflexible doctrine and justifies many atrocities in the name of rules at one point, i was somewhat interested in the non-aggression principle.

1 deontology's foil: consequentialism because deontological theories are best understood in contrast to consequentialist ones, a brief look at consequentialism and a survey of the problems with it that motivate its deontological opponents, provides a helpful prelude to taking up deontological theories themselves. Deontology (greek: deon means duty) is a theory in ethics, where one has an unchanging duty to abide by some set of moral principles, and nothing else thus, the ends never justify the means in this ethical system. Deontology vs teleology ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves questions about morality and the perception of good and evil, of right and wrong, of justice, virtue, and vice. A deontological system must either insist that the right moral action in this context is the one that ends up bringing about a horrific result or else provide for a means of resolving conflicts between different imperatives.

An example of a consequentialism system of ethics would be utilitarianism, in which the most morally desirable situation is that in which people's happiness is maximized virtue ethics - in which quality of character is the determiner of morality. In moral philosophy, deontological ethics or deontology (from greek δέον, deon, obligation, duty) is the normative ethical theory that the morality of an action should be based on whether that action itself is right or wrong under a series of rules, rather than based on the consequences of the action.

consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems Deontology (or deontological ethics) is the branch of ethics in which people define what is morally right or wrong by the actions themselves, rather than referring to the consequences of those actions, or the character of the person who performs them.
Consequentialist versus deontological ethical systems
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